Notice: Undefined property: plgSystemJoomSEO::$contentParagraph in /websites/fa/fatsilc.org.au/plugins/system/JoomSEO.php on line 288

Notice: Undefined property: plgSystemJoomSEO::$metaGenerator in /websites/fa/fatsilc.org.au/plugins/system/JoomSEO.php on line 239
Prelude | Nils, Australian, Report, Indigenous, Results, Aboriginal, Torres, Islander | FATSILC, Fed. Aboriginal Torres Strait Island Languages and Culture
 
National Indigenous Languages Survey Report 2005 PDF Print E-mail

Report submitted to the Department of Communications, Information Technology and the Arts by the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies in association with the Federation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Languages.

Read more...
 
NILS Report Letter PDF Print E-mail

 

Executive
Fax: 02 6261 4286

 

NILS Report 2005 Letter
NILS Report 2005 Letter

Worldwide knowledge and understanding of Australian Indigenous cultures, past and present

 

20 November 2005

Ms Helen Williams
The Secretary
Department of Communications, Information Technology and the Arts (DCITA)
38 Sydney Avenue, Forrest ACT 2603

 

Read more...
 
Executive Summary PDF Print E-mail

The National Indigenous Languages Survey (NILS) Report 2005 provides a summary and analysis of the results from a survey of Indigenous languages vitality status and resources that was carried out in 2004.

Read more...
 
Contacts for More Information on NILS PDF Print E-mail

For more information on the NILS Report or for enquiries on

accessing additional NILS results raw data contact:

 

Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS)

 

Read more...
 
Acronyms PDF Print E-mail
ABC Australian Broadcasting Commission
ABS Australian Bureau of Statistics
ACT Australian Capital Territory
Read more...
 
Key NILS results and recommendations PDF Print E-mail
The key NILS results on the state of Australian Indigenous languages are, in summary:
  • Most of Australia’s Indigenous languages are now no longer fully or fluently spoken. As many as 50 languages can be expected to reach this stage of endangerment in the next 20–30 years, as the most severely and critically endangered languages lose their last speakers.
Read more...